2015 Seed Grants

2015 Seed Grants

Chefs In The City

chefs in the city grantOSU Extension Franklin County has been active in the Hilltop through Master Gardeners, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Programs (EFNEP), and non-traditional 4-H. At the Highland Youth Garden (HYG), these programs annually impact 400 children. Partners include Franklin Park Conservatory's Growing to Green Program, the Dowd Education Center, Columbus City Schools, Columbus Bilingual Academy, Friends of the Hilltop, Mid-Ohio Food Bank, and area churches and charitable organizations.The HYG, like many of Columbus’s community gardens, provides produce to neighborhoods and food pantries. Unlike others, the HYG focuses on the garden as not only a source of healthy foods, but also as a rich learning environment, evidenced by the number of classrooms that come to the garden weekly not only to work in the soil, but also for STEM-based learning.

The OSU Medical Center partnered with the HYG to use vegetables and fruits these children grow and harvest to create and demonstrate nutritious plant based-recipes at the Columbus Bilingual Academy. Through this pilot nutrition program, more than 100 families had the opportunity to learn about creating healthy meals. Both children and adults were exposed to a broad range of produce, through our demonstrations and teaching they learned how to incorporate these foods into their diets, and left each session with both recipes and fresh produce to incorporate into family cooking. This model could be replicated throughout the city.

PI(s): James Warner, Program Director, Food and Nutrition, Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University
Partner(s): Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension Franklin County; Jermaine Kennedy, Director, Columbus Bilingual Academy; Mary Duchi, Beth Urban, Lisa Gibson, and Peggy Murphy, Steering Committee Members and Master Gardeners, Highland Youth Garden, c/oGladden Community Center; Kerry McCarthy, Programs Manager, Agency and Program Services, Mid-Ohio Foodbank; Ken Roth, Fresh Serv Produce Company


Teaching Food Safety And Nutrition To Visually Impaired Students: Content Knowledge, Attitudes, And Practices Of Teachers

food safety steps diagramFood safety and healthy nutrition remain an important public health issues. Certain consumer groups do not have adequate access to food safety and nutrition education. Students with visual impairment, including the blind, require access to education in food related independent living skills necessary to promote their health and well-being. Food safety and nutrition knowledge are especially important for this audience in terms of health and valuable for work placement. In Ohio, these topics are currently not being taught to visually impaired students in schools or in transitional programs. The teachers of visually impaired students may not have enough content knowledge to teach these topics in the classroom. The objective of this study was to assess food safety and nutrition knowledge and barriers to teaching nutrition and food safety among the teachers of youth with visual impairments. Needs assessment was conducted, among teachers of students of the blind in Ohio and nationally. We will use the results to design a tailored in-service training for the teachers in Ohio, specifically addressing the identified needs and knowledge gaps. This project is a first step to improving the quality of life of youth with visual impairments and their ability to self-manage their own health. It is in line with the Surgeon Generals goals of improving Health and Wellness of People with Disabilities.

PI(s): Sanja Ilic, Assistant Professor, Human Sciences, Education and Human Ecology; Irene Hatsu, Assistant Professor, Human Sciences, Education and Human Ecology
Partner(s): Tiffany Wild, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, Education and Human Ecology; Linnette Goard, Associate Professor /Field Specialist, OSU Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; Dan Remley, Assistant Professor/Field Specialist, OSU Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

 

Intergenerational Youth Development Through Urban Food Systems

farmers market

This grant was a partnership between OSU Extension, Franklin County; the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership; and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The goal of the program was to engage the community’s youth, to develop stronger community relationships around the New Harvest and Ama Vera Garden, and to encourage wider participation with New Harvest Urban Arts Café’s programs. A secondary goal was to promote health and wellness in the community by serving as a fresh food access point for Linden residents. Through intensive programming during summer and fall 2015 and follow-through programming in 2016, Linden youth, elders, and community partners were engaged in community development programs through food and agriculture projects. See Agrinaturalist articles by Crawford and DeAtley.

PI(s): Graham Cochran, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Beth Boomershine, Extension Educator, Franklin County Extension, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Partner(s): Susan Colbert, Franklin County Extension, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Mary Rodriguez, Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Kelly Henderson, Ph.D. Student, Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences;Tressa Augustine, Program Coordinator, Linden resident; Kwodwo Ababio, Executive Director of New Harvest Café and Urban Arts Center; Stacie Burbage, Program Coordinator-Young Scholars Program, Office-Diversity & Inclusion, Office of Academic Affairs

 

Greene County Health Literacy Addressing Infant Mortality (Hl-Aim)

infant mortality classA community-collaborative approach is critically needed to address the infant mortality issues affecting low-income mothers. Furthermore, a literature review indicates that a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) is an ideal model to communicate and coordinate care of obstetric services to improve the outcomes of high-risk pregnancies in Greene County, Ohio. A trained Health Advocate was hired to collect information from the mothers during their Clinic visits to the health department. Focus groups were also held to gather more qualitative information.

PI(s): Melanie Hart, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Greene County; Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, Director, Office for Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Director of Medical Education, College of Medicine; Karima Samadi, Student, College of Public Health
Partner(s): Robyn Fosnaugh, Community Health Service Director, Greene County Combined Health District; Shari Martin, Social Worker, Greene County Combined Health District; Jane McClelland, Pre-Natal Coordinator, Greene County Combined Health District

 

Making the Future Bright: The Solar Energy Curriculum Consortium (SECC)

solar panelsThe importance of renewable energy initiatives is obvious, yet less than 1% of electricity generated in Ohio is derived from solar energy. Furthermore, learners of all ages are largely uninformed about solar energy; there is a void of inquiry-based, data-driven lessons easily accessible to formal and informal educators throughout Ohio. Bringing a wealth of knowledge, experience and resources together, Ohio Sea Grant, Office of Energy and Environment, Department of Facilities, Operations, and Development, and Energize Ohio initiated the Solar Energy Curriculum Consortium (SECC). As a result of this funding opportunity, the SECC developed high quality, locally relevant solar energy curriculum to be used by formal and informal educators. The five lessons developed for the curriculum were: (1) Exploring Solar Technology, (2) Understanding the Mechanics of Solar Technology, (3) Using an Investigative Process to Explore Solar Thermal Technology, (4) Exploring Series and Parallel Circuits Using Solar Photovoltaic Arrays, and (5) Using Real-Time Data to Relate Solar Energy Production to the Sun's Location. These lessons were disseminated at two train-the-trainer style workshops held Stone Lab in June, 2016. In attendance were elementary, middle, and high school educators, and informal educators spanning k-12 audiences from 28 counties throughout Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. This curriculum will further be used as a springboard for additional collaborative efforts among the SECC to develop Ohio-focused renewable energy curricula, and can be showcased as a model approach to be used by environmental educators everywhere. Together, these efforts promote an energy-literate citizenry of informed and responsible decision makers and environmental stewards.

PI(s): Kristen Fussell, Executive Assistant, Center for Lake Erie Area Research, Office of Research and College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; Eric Romich, Assistant Professor and Extension Field Specialist, Energy Development, OSU Extension, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; Aparna Dial, University Energy and Sustainability Engineer, Facilities Operations and Development
Partner(s): Kristin Stanford, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Center for Lake Erie Area Research, Office of Research and College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; Lyndsey Manzo, Education Specialist, Center for Lake Erie Area Research, Office of Research and College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; Angela Greene, Education Specialist, Center for Lake Erie Area Research, Office of Research and College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences